Archive for October 2011

Welcome to the World, Ethan John Grichting!

October 29, 2011

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Ethan was born by C-section at 1:48 pm on the 28th of October. His birth weight was 3.545 kg (7lb13oz), and he is 47cm long. Mother & baby are both doing well.

Light is brilliant!

October 24, 2011

Light is brilliant – and weirder than you can imagine. For a start, we don’t actually know what it is. That’s right – we don’t know. We have lots of theories and models, but none of them are perfect.

We use three main models – Rays, Waves & Particles. This year, we focus on Rays & Waves, next year will be particles. There are a few posts on this blog about light – they have a *lot* of useful resources. Here are the links (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

We have spent some time looking at the concept of ray tracing – the idea that you see objects where they are because that is where individual light rays intersect. This is easy when it is simple, but gets a little more difficult when dealing with reflections, and even more difficult with curved lens or mirrors. Fortunately, the internet can be very helpful with this – here is a link to six different videos working out how to find where an image will be given different lens types and different object positions.

If you haven’t finished your own ray tracing task yet, here is an applet (online program) that will help you figure it out.

The next major task you have to do is your log book practicals; remember that for the next outcome, the only thing you will be allowed to take into the next outcome is your logbook. Questions on the outcome will require you to share and use your data that you collected, and explain what it demonstrates.

So remember that what you must include in your logbook is both examples of the data you collected as well as how it links to the theory. You do not have to do full practical write ups; but you must remember that your logbook is part of your assessment, so make sure it is easy to read and well organised.

Here are the different pracs you must do (there are some missing): Experiment 1, Experiment 2Experiment 3, Experiment 4Experiment 7Experiment 14Experiment 15Experiment 17, Experiment 18, Experiment 20.

You will be given three lessons in total; we will be conducting these pracs in the C9 darkroom. See you tomorrow.

 

Leaving Nothing to Chance

October 10, 2011

So, Year 10 probability comes to an end. There is nothing left to chance – but you need to make sure of that. To aid you in checking that you understand all the material presented, I want you to check the following two files (1, 2) and ensure that you are confident that you understand all of it.

If there are things you do not understand – particular topics, specific questions or exact concepts, you *must* comment to this post listing what it is that you do not understand.

If you are perfectly confident with the unit, then you must write your bound reference section on probability. This is due Monday of next week (the 17th).

Good luck, but if you have studied probability – you know that luck is an illusion!